Goat Vaccine Adverse Reaction Response

goat kid piccolstridium vax

Colorado Serum Company’s Clostridium Perfringens CDT Essential 3 + T and Recent Goat Vaccine Adverse Reaction.

It has been brought to our attention there was a case of a probable severe and unusual vaccine reactions in a goat herd in Oklahoma. The vaccine that is involved is Colorado Serum Company’s Clostridium Perfringens CDT Essential 3 + T (Clostridium Perfringens Types C & D – Tetanus Toxoid). The owner stated the vaccine was given to 4-6 week old goats in the evening and the next morning they presented with symptoms of being incoherent like they were passed out drunk, stumbling on weak legs, and 1 had passed away.

With any vaccinations there is potential for a vaccine reaction. This particular reaction is not typical. That being said, it is a scary situation and we felt we needed to contact the company on behalf of our clients.

We have spoken to the Colorado Serum Company’s veterinarian. They confirmed that this is a case that was reported to them and that they are working with the owner with treatments and possible cause. They have asked the owner to submit the one kid that died for a necropsy. They reassured us this not a typical vaccine reaction. In fact this is the only reaction of this type that has ever been reported.

The Clostridium Perfringens Types C & D – Tetanus Toxoid vaccination of theirs has been around for decades. We were told in the last 2 years they have sold 2-3 million doses and of those doses they figure at least 1.5 million doses have been given to goats. Of those 1.5 million doses to goats in the last 2 years they have only received, including this incident, 12 reports of any kind of reaction. The other 11 reports have been more typical vaccine reactions that can be seen with any vaccine. These symptoms may include lethargy, swollen face, and difficult breathing. These reactions usually happen within 1 to 2 hours of giving the vaccine.

This one non-typical reaction happened during an over night-time period. Symptoms included being completely down and out, uncoordinated, stumbling, weak legs, and 1 death.

We feel terrible that this has happened to this farm in Oklahoma. We hope their animals make a full recovery and that no other cases develop.

We do feel that this is an isolated incident. However, please keep in mind there is always potential (no matter how small the chance) of a vaccination reaction. It is always a good idea to vaccinate when you plan on being around for a while to observe your animals. If you do start to see a vaccine reaction please contact your veterinarian immediately. Your veterinarian will most likely have you administer medication such as benadryl, dexamethasone, banamine, and or epinephrine to help reverse the effects of the reaction.

If you have further questions please email us at pets@faribaultvet.com

Discount Equine Coggins & Vaccincation Clinic, Faribault, MN

 

Coggins and Vaccination Clinic

April 8th 2017, 1-3 pm

Rice County Fairgrounds

 

The Faribault Veterinary Clinic would like to invite you to attend a vaccination and coggins clinic to be held on Saturday April 8th, 1-3 pm at the Rice County Fairgrounds.  Dr. Jesse Sandbulte will be on site to collect blood samples at a reduced rate for Coggins test and to vaccinate your horses.  The Coggins test is ran to screen for Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA), a viral blood disease.  A negative Coggins test is mandatory if you are going to shows, public trail rides, any exhibition within the state, and for crossing the state line for any reason.

Due to the number of horses and time allowed, only vaccinations and Coggins will be performed.  Any other services, such as exams, worming, or dental work will need to be set up by calling our office.  WITH THE SPECIAL RATES, WE ARE ASKING THAT ALL SERVICES BE PAID FOR AT THE TIME PERFORMED.  We will be accepting cash, checks, and credit cards on site. You may also pre-pay at the clinic.

Pre-Register:  Pre-registering would be appreciated if you are able. You may do this by mailing in your Coggin’s Clinic insert form, or by calling or emailing us to let us know what you would like done.  Please have all pre-registration in no later than April 6th.  Of course anyone is welcome and pre-registering is not required.  By pre-registering we are hoping we will be more prepared and able to get to everyone even faster.

Mark your calendar for April 8th, 2017 and we’ll see you there rain or shine!

Special Rates: (Note: These prices are veterinarian administer prices. Most vaccines are      available for dispensing as well.)

Coggins Test:       $28       West Nile Combo:   $39        West Nile Only: $26.50

Potomac/Rabies:  $28        Influenza/Rhino:     $29       Strangles:           $31

Potomac Only:     $24           Rabies Only:           $18

  • West Nile Combo consists of West Nile, Eastern &

Western Encephalitis, and Tetanus.  We do not use a

Combo that also includes Rhino or Flu. We have seen

to many horses experience an adverse reaction when

all of the viruses are combined into one vaccination.

 

 

Check out the packages we have made….

Coggins Clinic Price List 2017 – View, Print, Send into the clinic or bring with on April 8th.

Horse Vaccination Descriptions 2016 – Which vaccinations do my horses need?

Livestock Comfort at the Fair

Rice-County-Fair-logo

Hot, Hot, Hot… This week doesn’t look favorable for man or beast, with the high heat and humidity. It is kind of interesting, as it was just a few months back we were complaining about how cold and wet our spring had been and that we were in need for the hot stuff. Well we sure got it now! However many county fairs start this week leaving fair exhibitors looking for coolness for both themselves and their fair animals. When temperatures reach above 80 degrees and the relative humidity is above 65 percent, comfort is certainly compromised. This kind of weather can be especially deadly for swine, as they have non functioning sweat glands. Here are some suggestions to keep your animals cool.

Signs of heat stress:

Animals under stress will be uncomfortable, much like we are when enduring this heat. General signs of stress are: panting, open mouth breathing, excessive salivation, lack of coordination, trembling, inability to stand, and high rectal temperature. During a heat wave it is difficult for animals to maintain their normal body temperature. Research shows as the heat and humidity increases during the heat of the day so does the body temperature of animals. If the heat and humidity continue during the evening hours and for many days, the animal can’t recover to it’s normal body temperature.

temp and humiditiy strees chart_edited-1

Transportation of animals:

Before transportation make sure the animals have been hydrated and sprinkle animals with water. Use wet shavings for bedding, never use straw . Straw acts as an insulator. Transport animals during the coolest part of the day, such as early morning or late evening. Haul as few animals as possible, don’t crowd animals in the trailer. In the trailer, unplug ventilation holes. Load and unload promptly. Fairs may need to adjust their schedule of arrival and departure of animals to accommodate the cooler part of the day.

pig

Barns at the fair:

There should be ample ventilation within the barns at the fair. When heat and humidity can’t be lowered, more air movement across people and animals can help remove heat, and lower heat stress. To run the amount of fans that would be needed to create air movement, more electrical use maybe needed. Thus generators might be needed for supplemental electricity and located away from spectators as they are noisy and distracting. If animals are located on the outside edge of a barn where sunlight shows, use tarps to shade the morning or afternoon light. Make sure it isn’t trapping heat, making the situation worse.

At the fair:

Check in is a situation where fair staff should consider an alternative time for weighing, ultra sounding, etc. of animals. Facilities should lend themselves to a low stress environment and the process should be quick and effortless. The show also might need to be conducted at an alternative time. Moving the show into the evening hours could be advantageous. Water animals and utilize electrolytes if needed to get animals to drink. Allow access to water at all times, with out them making a mess of their pen. Rinse animals to keep cool. It might be easier and less stressful to rinse them in their pen rather than taking them to a wash rack numerous times throughout the day. Early release of animals from the fair may need to be considered. Load out procedures should be followed as stated earlier. Animal grouping should be another consideration if possible. Don’t put as many animals in a pen and leave some distance between tied animals in the barn.

Your #1 responsibility at the fair are you and your animals, therefore it is crucial to be there early in the morning till late at night managing them. While the fair is time for fun, events and friends, these conditions could be life threatening for your animals. Pay attention and have a great fair experience.

 

  • Reference UW Extension, Berine O’Rourke

 

IMRESTOR, New Product For Dairy Farms

IMR-HeroAvailable-1168x590

Contact your veterinarian to request a prescription and get more information about purchasing Imrestor.

Imrestor is a protein that helps restore the integrity of a cow’s innate immune system during the time when she experiences periparturient immune suppression. By reducing the incidence of mastitis around calving, Imrestor is the helping hand a dairy farm needs to help protect her potential. Imrestor helps:

Restore

the function and increase the number of neutrophils when periparturient immune suppression leaves her vulnerable to infection

Reduce

the incidence of clinical mastitis around calving by 28%

Protect

her potential and the well-being of the entire dairy, as well as minimize the frustration of treating mastitis, with a product that is proven safe and effective for your herd

IMR-Product-pkg-500x468

Imrestor is administered with 2 subcutaneous injections

Injection #1: 7 days* before the anticipated date of calving

Injection #2: within 24 hours after calving. Each cow should always receive both doses of Imrestor

*4-10 days to accommodate management schedules.
See label for complete dosage and administration instructions.

ASK DR. JESSE OR DR. KRISTI FOR MORE INFORMATION WHEN THEY ARE OUT AT YOUR FARM.

SAVE THE DATE: AUG. 3RD, NOON FOR A MEETING ON IMRESTOR.

http://www.faribaultvet.com

email: pets@faribaultvet.com

(507) 334-2068

May 2016 Needle News

mothers day

Happy Spring! We would like to thank all of our hard working mom’s out there for all that they do! I have seen many of you have been busy in the fields, but don’t let your livestock work fall behind. Now is the time to start treating for flies with ear tags or feed additives. Another spring time chore is to vaccinate for pinkeye. This helps prevent and control ocular lesions cause by Moraxella bovis. Those animals going out on pasture are most susceptible. Just call into the clinic to place your order with Nicole or Heidi. We need the number of animals you plan to treat.

Feed directives will be mandatory for antibiotic use in feed and water come January 2017. This will require us to write a script to your feed mill for such use. The medications are only being allowed for the specific duration listed by the drug manufacturer. Medications are to be used for treatment and prevention of specific aliments. Medications used to treat for Coccidia are not included in this new regulation. At this time there is absolutely no off label use. These scripts will be sent electronically to your feed mill. A copy may also be sent to you for your records. You will also have access to all of your script records through the internet site we will be using at, myvetlink.com. We will have more information later on how to set up your account. In the mean time we would like to start getting everybody’s info so that we are prepared when the scripts are required. What we need is your email, the best phone number to get a hold of you, and what feed mill you use. Please click on this link, Veterinary Feed Directive Form, to access the feed directive form. Follow the directions on how to access the form and print out the pdf.  Once you have filled it out you can send it pack via email at pets@faribaultvet.com or fax back to (507) 334-8995.


 

Please join us on May 10th at the Faribault Trucker’s Inn at noon to enjoy a free lunch buffet and learn how Longrange can improve your cattle production. LONGRANGE® (eprinomectin) is the first extended-release injection that delivers up to 150 days of parasite control in a single dose. Thanks to its unique THERAPHASE™ formulation, a single treatment works long enough to break the parasite life cycle and reduce pasture reinfection. And that’s something conventional dewormers just can’t match. Please RSVP to the Faribault Veterinary Clinic with the number attending by Sat. 5/7/16 before 12:00 pm. Space is limited. (507) 334-2068 or nicole@faribaultvet.com Hope to see you there!

 


 

Early note: The Herdsman Lunch for Dairy month and for our appreciation this year is on Wednesday, June 29th from 11am – 2pm. Mark Smith with MWI will be grilling for us this year. We will also have other reps. from some of our drug companies here as well. So bring your questions because they’ll be here to answer them for you.

2016 Equine Newsletter

HorsesLogo

Coggins & Vaccination Clinic
April 9th 2016, 1-3 pm
Rice County Fairgrounds

The Faribault Veterinary Clinic would like to invite you to attend a vaccination and coggins clinic to be held on Saturday April 9th, 1-3 pm at the Rice County Fairgrounds. We will be on site to collect blood samples at a reduced rate for Coggins test and to vaccinate your horses. The Coggins test is ran to screen for Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA), a viral blood disease. A negative Coggins test is mandatory if you are going to shows, public trail rides, any exhibition within the state, and for crossing the state line for any reason.

Due to the number of horses and time allowed, only vaccinations and Coggins will be performed. Any other services, such as exams, worming, or dental work will need to be set up by calling our office. WITH THE SPECIAL RATES, WE ARE ASKING THAT ALL SERVICES BE PAID FOR AT THE TIME PERFORMED. We will be accepting cash, checks, and credit cards on site.

We are asking if you are able, we would appreciate if you could pre-register. You may do this by mailing in your Coggin’s Clinic insert form, or by calling or emailing us to let us know what you would like done. Please have all pre-registration in no later than April 7th. Of course anyone is welcome and pre-registering is not required. By pre-registering we are hoping we will be more prepared and able to get to everyone even faster.

Coggins Clinic Form

Mark your calendar for April 9th, 2016 and we’ll see you there rain or shine!

Special Rates: (Note: These prices are veterinarian administer prices Most vaccines are available for dispensing as well.)
Coggins Test: $27 West Nile Combo: $38 West Nile Only: $26.50
Potomac/Rabies: $28 Influenza/Rhino: $29 Strangles: $30
Potomac Only: $23 Rabies Only: $25


Which Vaccines Does My Horse NEED?

Equine Herpes Virus 1 – also called Rhinopheumonitis or Rhino- causes upper respiratory or neurological signs in horses. Can cause abortions in pregnant mares.

Equine Influenza – also called Flu – causes hacking cough primarily in younger horses. Easily passes horse to horse.

Eastern Equine Encephalitis – also called EEE or Sleeping Sickness – spread by mosquitoes and causes a swelling of the horse’s brain. Very deadly, treatment is by supportive care only. Included in West Nile Combo.

Western Equine Encephalitis – also called WEE or Sleeping Sickness – spread by mosquitoes and causes a swelling of the horse’s brain. Not as deadly as EEE, but can cause severe illness in horses. Included in West Nile Combo.

Tetanus – also called Lockjaw – caused by a bacteria Clostridium tetani, which can be found in the soil and droppings for a long time. Causes muscles to lock up. Is often deadly but easily prevented with vaccination. Included in West Nile Combo.

Rabies – Transmitted by an infected animal biting another animal or person. In MN, skunks and bats are the most common rabid animal. Rabies is fatal and affects the nervous system of mammals. It is easily prevented by vaccination.

Potomac – also called Potomac Horse Fever – causes fever and diarrhea in adult horses. Water snails and mayflies from infected water sources transmit Potomac. Southern MN has a hot spot for Potomac outbreaks.

Strangles – caused by Streptococcus equi, causes swelling of the lymph nodes under the jaw and fever. Highly contagious from horse to horse and can be in the environment for 2 months after an outbreak on a farm.

West Nile – spread by mosquitoes and causes muscle weakness, stumbling, tripping, vision loss, loss of appetite. Any horse is at risk as mosquitoes are all over MN! Included in West Nile Combo.

Horses that trail ride or travel, spend time with other horses outside of their own herd, or have contact with horses that travel (like the geriatric horse that stays home but the barn buddies travel need to be vaccinated for Rhino, Flu, EEE, WEE, Tetanus, West Nile, Potomac, Rabies, and Strangles.)

Horses that do NOT travel to the southern US (Texas, Arizona, etc.) or Mexico do not need a 6 or 7 way that contain Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis.

We do not use a West Nile combo shot that also included Rhino or Flu. We have seen to many horses experience an adverse reaction when all of the viruses are combined into one vaccination.

If you have any questions about how to best protect your equine herd, give Nicole or Heidi a call at (507) 334-2068
pets@faribaultvet.com